The SEC wants to file a 90-page reply brief to exclude the testimonies of 10 Ripple experts

The commission wants to support its previous motion with a 90-page reply brief to exclude the testimonies of 10 Ripple experts. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is requesting leave to file a lengthy reply to further support its omnibus (big) motion to exclude the testimonies of Ripple’s witnesses.

SEC Requests to File a 90-Page Reply Brief to Exclude 10 Ripple Experts’ Testimonies

According to the letter, the SEC wants to file a 90-page reply brief to exclude the testimonies of 10 Ripple experts.

“The motion seeks to exclude or limit the testimony of 10 experts retained by Defendants, Ripple Labs, Chris Larsen, and Brad Garlinghouse,” the SEC noted in its letter.

It is noteworthy that the court had previously granted the commission’s request to file an opening brief of up to 120 pages in support of the motion to exclude Ripple experts’ testimonies.

While the order did not specify a page limit for replies, the order, as well as the court’s individual practices in civil cases allows a 15-page limit for replies, the SEC stated.

Based on this, the SEC is requesting to file a 90-page omnibus reply in support of its motion to exclude the testimonies of 10 Ripple experts.

The SEC added that the omnibus reply it intends to file is 60 pages shorter than what it would have been if it chose to file a 15-page reply for each expert.

Additionally, the 90-page omnibus reply the SEC seeks to file is also 30-page shorter than the number of pages the court granted the commission for its opening omnibus brief.

Ripple Did Not Object But Makes Its Own Request

SEC stated that Ripple did not object to its request. However, the blockchain company and its executives also want an 11-page limit for its reply brief to further support its motion to exclude the testimonies of five of SEC’s experts.

In the same vein, the SEC does not object to Ripple’s request.

“For these reasons, the SEC respectfully requests that the court grant this motion,” the Securities and Exchange Commission concluded.

The development was shared on Twitter by attorney James K. Filan, a former U.S. federal prosecutor.

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